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Translating Physiological Knowledge to Health Application

  • W. Selvamurthy
  • Shashi Bala Singh
Chapter

Abstract

Physiology forms the basis for medical practice. Earlier in India, physiological research undertaken by medical teachers and researchers was primarily focused towards publications rather than translating that knowledge into a device/technology/process. The Defence Physiological Research and Development endeavours have provided a new paradigm since 1960 with the establishment of Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences (DIPAS). Most of the research efforts were aimed at finding solution to problems encountered by soldiers operating in extreme operational environments such as high-altitude, cold, desert, underwater and aerospace environments. Even the basic physiological research had an ultimate aim of application for the well-being of the soldiers thereby focusing on translational component. To cite a few examples, physiological responses during high-altitude acclimatisation studied on sojourners were translated to formulate the staging of acclimatisation schedule at high altitude. The nitric oxide and oxygen therapy for treatment of high-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) resulted from the pathophysiological studies undertaken on the patients with HAPE. This resulted in devising an equipment to deliver a precise concentration of nitric oxide and oxygen to the patients while monitoring the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. Studies carried out to assess the physiological effects of heat stress resulted in formulating an ergogenic drink to keep the fluid electrolyte balance, thereby optimising the physical and mental efficiency of soldiers operating in desert environment. Development of a radio sensitiser, namely, 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG), came out of physiological research to find a method to ameliorate the adverse effects of radiotherapy in cancer patients. Such examples of translational research in physiology led to the development of products/technologies/processes which helped in providing health solutions which are illustrated in this chapter.

Keywords

Prussian Blue Acute Mountain Sickness Nerve Agent Cold Injury Physiological Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO)Life Sciences (LS) and International Cooperation (IC)New DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences (DIPAS)New DelhiIndia

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