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Ornamental Crops

  • P. Parvatha Reddy
Chapter

Abstract

Economic importance and losses, symptoms/damage, pre-disposing factors, epidemiology, survival and spread, and biointensive integrated management of insect and mite pests, fungal, bacterial, viral/mycoplasma diseases, nematode pests, and disease complexes of ornamental crops (rose, carnation, gerbera, gladiolus, tuberose, chrysanthemum, and crossandra) using physical, cultural, chemical, botanicals, bioagents, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and host resistance are discussed.

Keywords

Fusarium Oxysporum Flower Yield Plant Growth Parameter Meloidogyne Incognita Neem Cake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Former DirectorIndian Institute of Horticultural ResearchBangaloreIndia

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