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Nematode Diseases of Horticultural Crops

  • N. G. Ravichandra
Chapter

Abstract

About 132 species of nematodes belonging to 54 genera are reported to be associated with banana rhizosphere. In the same order, the burrowing nematode, Radopholus similis, followed by the lesion nematode (Pratylenchus coffeae), spiral nematodes (Helicotylenchus erythrinae, H. multicinctus, H. dihystera), root-knot nematode (M. incognita, M. javanica), and reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), is economically important in most banana-growing areas.

Keywords

Nematode Population Soil Solarization Root Lesion Nematode Feeder Root Neem Cake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. G. Ravichandra
    • 1
  1. 1.AICRP (Nematodes) Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of Agricultural SciencesBangaloreIndia

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