Advertisement

Improving Nutrition Status: Lessons from International Experience

  • Nira Ramachandran
Chapter

Abstract

Any search for developing countries which have made the breakthrough from poor to excellent nutrition levels pinpoints four names: Thailand, China, Brazil and Mexico. While the strategy adopted in each country varied, the results achieved were uniformly admirable. This only serves to underline the fact that every country needs to find its own path to improvement. Copycat tactics may or may not succeed in the long term, and are likely to result in wasted investment and unsustainable outcomes. On the other hand, an analysis of success stories and even failures in other settings can do much to clarify our own objectives, strategies, time frames and course of action. This chapter seeks to learn from the big four as well as more recent successes in countries like Malawi, Mozambique, Peru and Bangladesh.

Keywords

Severe Acute Malnutrition Protein Energy Malnutrition Child Malnutrition Conditional Cash Transfer Protein Energy Malnutrition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. ACF. (2011). Bangladesh: Under-nutrition progress “success story”. Retrieved January 17, 2013, from http://www.irinnews.org/Report/91975/BANGLADESH-Under-nutrition-progress-success-story
  2. Ahmed, T., Mahfuz, M., Ireen, S., Ahmed, A. M. S., Rahman, S., & Islam, M. M., et al. (2012, March). Nutrition of children and women in Bangladesh: Trends and directions for the future. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, 30(1): 1–11.Google Scholar
  3. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics. (2007). Report of the household income and expenditure survey 2005 (p. 466). Dhaka: Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.Google Scholar
  4. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics. (2011). Primary report of the household income and expenditure survey 2010 (p. 115). Dhaka: Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.Google Scholar
  5. Behrman, Jere R., & Hoddinott, John. (2000). An evaluation of the impact of PROGRESA on pre-school child height (p. 20). Washington, DC: IFPRI.Google Scholar
  6. De Souza, P. A. (2008). The fight against poverty and hunger in Brazil, presentation at the centre for studies in food security. Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. Retrieved January 17, 2013, from http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc63essay02.pdf
  7. Editorial Committee of Today’s China series. (1988a). Agriculture of today’s China (p. 47–53). Beijing: China Social Science Press.Google Scholar
  8. Editorial Committee of Today’s China series. (1988b). Grain issues of today’s China (pp. 67–103). Beijing: China Social Science Press.Google Scholar
  9. Gertler, P. (2000). Final report: The impact of PROGRESA on health (p. 14). Washington, DC: IFPPRI.Google Scholar
  10. Government of Peru. (2009). Case study Juntos Program, OptiMap PopChart. Retrieved December  15, 2012, from http://www.docstoc.com/docs/5422599/CASE-STUDY-OptiMap-PopChart-Government-of-Peru-Juntos-Program
  11. Government of Peru. Juntos program: Case study. Retrieved January 17, 2013, from http://www.corda.com/company/resources/case_study/peru-juntos.pdf
  12. IPE. (2008). Analysis of potential options for a framework of support to nutrition interventions. Final Report submitted to DFID, Government of UK. Infrastructure Professionals Enterprise Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi. Kachondham, Y., Winichagoon, P. & Tontisirin, K. (1992), Nutrition and health in Thailand: Trends and action, UNSSCN 1992, 124, Thailand: Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University.Google Scholar
  13. Kachondham, Y., Winichagoon, P. & Tontisirin, K. (1992), Nutrition and health in Thailand: Trends and action, UNSSCN 1992, 124, Thailand: Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol UniversityGoogle Scholar
  14. Nandi, S., & Garg, S. (undated). Reducing child malnutrition: Thailand experience (1977-86)a review of international literature. Retrieved January 17, 2013, from http://www.righttofoodindia.org/data/garg-nandi07thailand-reducing-child-malnutrition.pdf
  15. Perova, E., & Vakis, R. (2009). Welfare impacts of the “Juntos” program in Peru: Evidence from a non-experimental evaluation. The World Bank. Retrieved January 23, 2013, from http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTPERUINSPANISH/Resources/Perova_Vakis_JuntosIE.pdf
  16. Shawa, M. (undated). Presentation on the factors for Malawi’s success in addressing malnutrition. Principal Secretary Nutrition, Government of Malawi’s HIV/AIDS Office of the President and Cabinet. Retrieved January 17, 2013, from http://africastories.usaid.gov/search_details.cfm?storyID=343&countryID=15&sectorID=0&yearID=5
  17. SUN. (undated). Scaling up nutrition: Malawi. Retrieved from January 17, 2012, from http://scalingupnutrition.org/sun-countries/malawi
  18. USAID. (2005). Neighbours promote healthy eating practices in rural Mozambique. Retrieved January 17, 2013, from http://africastories.usaid.gov/search_details.cfm?storyID=343&countryID=15&sectorID=0&yearID=5
  19. USAID. (2011). IYCN project: Country brief, Malawi: strengthening nutrition support in Malawi’s communities. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://www.iycn.org/countries/malawi/
  20. Vaisman, C. (2012). Brazil delivers on hunger promise. Marketplace. April 4, 2012. Retrieved January 23, 2013, from http://www.marketplace.org/topics/sustainability/food-9-billion/brazil-delivers-hunger-promise
  21. World Bank. (2004). Mexico’s oportunidades program. Shanghai Poverty Conference, May 25–27, 2004: Case Study Summary. Retrieved from January 15, 2013, from http://info.worldbank.org/etools/docs/reducingpoverty/case/119/summary/Mexico-Oportunidades%20Summary.pdf

Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Independent Development ConsultantGurgaonIndia

Personalised recommendations