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Student Migration at the Global Trijuncture of Higher Education, Competition for Talent and Migration Management

  • Ana Mosneaga
Chapter
Part of the Dynamics of Asian Development book series (DAD)

Abstract

International student migration is increasingly regarded as a subclass of talent mobility within the globalising knowledge economy, where a highly educated workforce is seen as a prerequisite for sustaining growth. This chapter looks at examples of relevant developments in European destination countries and examines the processes that shape international student migration as the nexus point where the globalisation of higher education, the global competition for talent and national migration management practices all converge. This chapter also establishes the wider context required to holistically position empirical findings on the migration and mobility of international students within the framework of existing understandings and current debates about the trends that make up this trijuncture. The conclusions point to a number of deep-rooted tensions that transform the interaction between the different agendas of the globalisation of higher education, talent attraction and migration management into a highly contested process, which often results in inconsistent policy outcomes.

Keywords

High Education International Student Foreign Student Student Mobility Skilled Migrant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section for GeographyUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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