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The Pathogen

  • Govind Singh Saharan
  • Prithwi Raj Verma
  • Prabhu Dayal Meena
  • Arvind Kumar
Chapter

Abstract

Biga (Sydowia, 9, 339–358, 1955) re-examined the morphology of the sporangia and constructed a key, in Italian, to differentiate species of genus Albugo. Wilson (Torry Botanical Club Bulletin, 34, 61–84, 1907) described the North American species, Savulescu (Anal. Acad. Rous. Mem. Sect.Stimtiface. Soc, 21, 13, 1946a, A study on the European species of the genus Cystopus Lev. With special reference to the species found in Rumania. Thesis 213. University of Bucarest, Rumania, 1946b) the Romanian species, and Wakefield (Transactions of British Mycological Society, 2, 242–246, 1927) gave a historical note on the genus in her account of the species in South Africa.

Keywords

Internal Transcribe Spacer Germ Tube Brassica Crop White Rust Uniform Wall Thickness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Govind Singh Saharan
    • 1
  • Prithwi Raj Verma
    • 2
  • Prabhu Dayal Meena
    • 3
  • Arvind Kumar
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Plant PathologyCCS Haryana Agricultural UniversityHisarIndia
  2. 2.Agriculture and Agi-Food Canada Saskatoon Research StationSaskatoonCanada
  3. 3.Crop Protection UnitDirectorate of Rapeseed – Mustard Research (ICAR)BharatpurIndia
  4. 4.Krishi Anusandhan Bhawan – IIIndian Council of Agricultural ResearchNew DelhiIndia

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