Advertisement

Microbial Pathogenicity: A New Approach to Drug Development

  • Ananda M. ChakrabartyEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 808)

Abstract

Pathogenic microorganisms, particularly pathogenic bacteria that cause debilitating diseases, are considered a threat for human health and well-being. Infectious diseases are rampant, particularly in developing countries. However, there are many other deadly diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiac malfunction, etc., that account for significant loss of life and trauma in our society. In this article, I try to describe the role certain bacterial pathogens with long term residence in the human body can play in providing us with our next generation anticancer and other drugs, demonstrating that a certain amount of good can come out of such bacterial pathogens as well.

Keywords

Microbial pathogenicity Infectious diseases Drug development Cancer 

References

  1. 1.
    Nicoletti F, Fagone P, Meroni P, McCubrey J, Bendtzen K (2011) mTOR as a multifunctional therapeutic target in HIV infection. Drug Discov Today 16:715–721CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Fialho AM, Chakrabarty AM (2012) Patent controversies and court cases: Cancer diagnosis, therapy and prevention. Cancer Biol Ther 13:1229–1234CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Avner BS, Fialho AM, Chakrabarty AM (2012) Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework. Bioeng Bugs 3:262–270Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bernardes N, Chakrabarty AM, Fialho AM (2013) Engineering of bacterial strains and their products for cancer therapy. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. doi: 10.1007/s00253-013-4926-6 Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Fialho AM, Chakrabarty AM (eds) (2010) Emerging cancer therapy: microbial approaches and biotechnological tools. Wiley, HobokenGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Fialho AM, Chakrabarty AM (2010) Promiscuous anticancer drugs from pathogenic bacteria: rational versus intelligent drug design. In: Fialho AM, Chakrabarty AM (eds) Emerging cancer therapy: microbial approaches and biotechnological tools. Wiley, Hoboken, pp 181–198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Das Gupta TK, Chakrabarty AM (2009) Compositions and methods to prevent cancer with cupredoxins. US patent 7,618,939, 17 Nov 2009Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Richards JM, Warso MA, Mehta D, Christov K, Schaeffer CM, Yamada T, Beattie CW, Bressler LR, Das Gupta TK (2011) A first-in-class, first-in-human phase I trial of p28, a non-HDM2-mediated peptide inhibitor of p53 ubiquitination in patients with metastatic refractory solid tumors. J Clin Oncol 29:2511 (abstract)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Warso MA, Richards JM, Mehta D, Christov K, Schaeffer C et al (2013) A first-in-class, first-in-human, phase I trial of p28, a non-HDM2-mediated peptide inhibitor of p53 ubiquitination in patients with advanced solid tumours. Br J Cancer. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2013.74 Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hong CS, Yamada T, Hashimoto W, Fialho AM, Das Gupta, TK, Chakrabarty AM (2006) Disrupting the entry barrier and attacking brain tumors: the role of the Neisseria H.8 epitope and the Laz protein. Cell Cycle 5:1633–1641Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hong CS, Yamada T, Fialho AM, Das Gupta, TK, Chakrabarty AM (2010) Transport agents for crossing the blood-brain barrier and into brain cancer cells, and methods of use thereof. US patent 7,807,183, 5 Oct 2010Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Fialho AM, Salunkhe P, Manna S, Mahali S, Chakrabarty AM (2012) Glioblastoma multiforme: novel therapeutic approaches. ISRN Neurology: 642345; PMID: 22462021. doi:  10.5402/2012/642345

Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Illinois College of MedicineChicagoUSA

Personalised recommendations