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Fodder Quality of Maize: Its Preservation

  • D. P. Chaudhary
  • S. L. Jat
  • R. Kumar
  • A. Kumar
  • B. Kumar
Chapter

Abstract

Green fodder is an important component of animal husbandry. The growth of dairy sector primarily depends upon the availability of nutritious fodder. Maize is one of the most nutritious non-legume green fodders. The high acceptability of maize as fodder can be judged from the fact that it is free from any anti-nutritional components. Maize is quick growing, yields high biomass, and is highly palatable. It contains sufficient quantities of protein and minerals and possesses high digestibility as compared to other non-legume fodders. It contains high concentrations of soluble sugars in the green stage, which makes it most fit for preservation as silage. The abundance of green fodder due to increasing cultivation of specialty corn could greatly help in boosting the prospects of dairy sector in the peri-urban regions of the country.

Keywords

Sweet Corn Forage Quality Dairy Sector Green Fodder Fodder Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. P. Chaudhary
    • 1
  • S. L. Jat
    • 1
  • R. Kumar
    • 1
  • A. Kumar
    • 2
  • B. Kumar
    • 3
  1. 1.Directorate of Maize ResearchNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Central Soil and Salinity Research InstituteKarnalIndia
  3. 3.Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences UniversityLudhianaIndia

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