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Causation of Disease

  • Sudhi Ranjan Garg
Chapter

Abstract

Rabies viruses consist of a group of negative-strand RNA neurotropic viruses of the genus Lyssavirus. The classical rabies virus found worldwide is responsible for classical rabies that constitutes a vast majority of rabies cases. Other lyssaviruses appear to have more restricted geographical and host range. All species of mammals are susceptible but only a few species are important as major reservoirs. The virus is transmitted between mammals usually through saliva and animal bites. Contact with infectious saliva or neurological tissues, through mucous membrane or abraded skin, may also cause infection. Dogs are the main hosts in Asia and Africa while wild animals act as major hosts in Europe, North America, and Australia, from which the disease spills over to domestic animals and humans. Certain categories of people such as those living in or travelling to the rabies-endemic areas or those occupationally exposed to animals, animal bites, or infected material face greater risk of infection. Inadequate medical facilities and unavailability of vaccines and immunoglobulin in rural high-risk areas make the residents and travellers more prone to the disease.

Keywords

Rabies Virus Rabies Case Unpasteurised Milk Rabies Infection Abrade Skin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sudhi Ranjan Garg
    • 1
  1. 1.Veterinary Public Health & EpidemiologyLala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal SciencesHisarIndia

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