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Nabadiganta: Women Workers in Kolkata’s IT Sector

  • Zakir HusainEmail author
  • Mousumi Dutta
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Sociology book series (BRIEFSSOCY)

Abstract

This chapter traces the growth and importance of the IT sector in India, and its development in Kolkata. It describes the socioeconomic characteristics of the women respondents surveyed, and discusses controversial issues such as gender relations at the workplace, gender differentials in wages, sexual harassment, work–household balance, childcare, leisure hours and the impact of outsourcing restrictions on the agency of women. The chapter discusses our survey findings to illuminate these issues, and repudiates the negative image of the IT sector created by the popular media.

Keywords

Wage gap Childcare Work relations 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities and Social SciencesIndian Institute of Technology KharagpurKharagpurIndia
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsPresidency UniversityKolkataIndia

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