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Molecular Markers

  • Pavan Kumar Agrawal
  • Rahul Shrivastava

Abstract

Detection and analysis of genetic variation help in understanding the molecular basis of various biological phenomena in eukaryotes. Since the entire eukaryotes cannot be covered under sequencing projects, molecular markers and their correlation to phenotypes provide with requisite landmarks for elucidation of genetic variation. There are different types of DNA-based molecular markers. These DNA-based markers are differentiated into two types; first nonPCR-based (RFLP) and second is PCR-based markers (RAPD, AFLP, SSR, SNP etc.). Amongst others, the microsatellite DNA marker has been the most widely used in ecological, evolutionary, taxonomical, phylogenetic, and genetic studies due to its easy use by simple PCR, followed by a denaturing gel electrophoresis for allele size determination and high degree of information provided by its large number of alleles per locus. Despite this, a new marker type, named SNP, for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, is now on the scene and has gained high popularity, even though it is only a bi-allelic type of marker. Day by day development of such new and specific types of markers makes their importance in understanding the genomic variability and the diversity between the same as well as different species of the plants. In this chapter, we have discussed types of molecular markers, their advantages, disadvantages, and the applications.

Keywords

Polymerase Chain Reaction Quantitative Trait Locus Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Simple Sequence Repeat Marker Microsatellite Region 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Govind Ballabh Pant Engineering CollegeGhurdauri, PauriIndia
  2. 2.Department of Biotechnology and BioinformaticsJaypee University of Information TechnologyWaknaghat, SolanIndia

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