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Mangroves: A Unique Gift of Nature

  • Abhijit Mitra
Chapter

Abstract

Mangroves are salt-tolerant forest ecosystems found mainly in the tropical and subtropical intertidal regions of the world. They encompass swamps, forestland within, and the surrounding water bodies. It is a matter of great surprise that mangrove floral species can thrive luxuriantly in saline habitat (which is basically physiologically dry in nature) through orientation of their morphological, anatomical and physiological systems. Thus, this vegetation is the most efficiently adapted biotic community in response to climate-change-induced sea-level rise.

Keywords

Mangrove Forest Horseshoe Crab Mangrove Species Mangrove Ecosystem Salt Gland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abhijit Mitra
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Marine ScienceUniversity of CalcuttaKolkataIndia

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