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Gender and Perfect Separability: The Indian Experience

  • Atanu Sengupta
  • Soumyendra Kishore Datta
  • Susanta Mondal
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Economics book series (BRIEFSECONOMICS)

Abstract

Next we consider the full seperability (JS) case. The coefficients of the estimated production functions in the JS case are provided in Tables 7.1 and 7.2 respectively. The labour and capital coefficients are significant and the R2 is quite high. The fit is good enough for further analysis. Using the formulae ( 4.18) for shadow wages, we then calculate them using the estimated equations.

Keywords

Literacy Rate Female Labour Female Entrepreneur Full Seperability Female Entrepreneurship 
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Reference

  1. Mitra A (2005) Women in the urban informal sector: perpetuation of meagre earnings. Devel Change 36:291–316CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Skoufias E (1994) Using shadow wages to estimate labor supply of agricultural households. Am J Agric Econ 76(2):215–227CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Atanu Sengupta
    • 1
  • Soumyendra Kishore Datta
    • 1
  • Susanta Mondal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsBurdwan UniversityBurdwanIndia

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