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Reverse Brain Drain: New Strategies by Developed and Developing Countries

  • Anjali Sahay
Chapter

Abstract

Historically, advanced economies, such as the United States, have thrived through visa regimes that are geared towards drawing the best and the brightest to their shores. With increasing opportunities now available in many developing Asian countries such as India, China, South Korea and Singapore, the global recession in the United States, as well as stricter immigration laws, has increased the phenomenon of ‘returnees’ as thousands of professionals return to their home countries. This research is an attempt at understanding both the roles played by developed countries, in particular the United States in retaining talented immigrants in their countries, and developing countries (Asian in particular) in making their countries more attractive for return. The Startup Visa Bill in the Senate represents the most aggressive attempt yet to both attract and retain the best of entrepreneurship and talent on American shores. On the other hand, the creation of many EduCities and other strategies in different developing Asian countries reflects their grand strategy in becoming centres for Western education retaining their national talent as well as attracting many others. The chapter will reflect on these strategies to gain a broader understanding of the many nuances in the debate on brain drain and brain gain in the twenty-first century.

Keywords

Human Capital Home Country Immigration Policy Brain Drain Foreign Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

DCs

Developed countries

LDCs

Less developing countries

H-1B

Category of specialist worker visa

F1

Category for student visa

DHS

Department of homeland security

IRCA

Immigration reform and control act

IT

Information technology

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political, Legal, and International StudiesGannon UniversityErieUSA

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