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Inclusive Growth, Employment and Rural Poverty

  • Madhusudan Ghosh
Chapter
Part of the India Studies in Business and Economics book series (ISBE)

Abstract

This chapter examines the trickle-down process and the inclusiveness of growth in rural India. The benefits of growth in agriculture seem to have trickled down to the rural poor, but the strength of the trickle-down process and the inclusiveness of growth have been limited and are weakening with time. The regressive features of the agrarian structure and the process of marginalisation and proletarianisation of the peasantry seem to have aggravated rural poverty. Expansion of productive employment through various employment-generating schemes in the farm and nonfarm sectors in rural areas, with appropriate measures for improving the governance and service delivery to the targeted groups of people, could play a significant role in alleviating rural poverty. The strategy of inclusive growth should incorporate appropriate policies so that agricultural labourers and marginal and small farmers could participate productively in the growth process.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Agricultural Labourer Rural Poverty Inclusive Growth Uttar Pradesh 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Madhusudan Ghosh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Economics & PoliticsVisva- BharatiSantiniketan, BirbhumIndia

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