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Regional Disparities in Education, Health and Human Development

  • Madhusudan Ghosh
Chapter
Part of the India Studies in Business and Economics book series (ISBE)

Abstract

This chapter evaluates the relative performance of 15 major Indian states on education, health and human development. It examines the regional disparities in the indicators of human development and their association with per capita income and per capita social sector expenditure. The results show regional convergence in human development despite a divergence in real per capita income, indicating that the poor states, which failed to catch up with the rich ones in terms of per capita income, have, however, managed to catch up in terms of human development. Female literacy is found to have a significant impact on human development. The effects of per capita social sector expenditure on human development are found to be stronger than those of per capita income. This suggests that the strategy for improving various dimensions of human development by increasing government expenditure on social services would be more effective than the automatic improvement in human development resulting from the growth in per capita income.

Keywords

Capita Income Human Development Index Regional Disparity Uttar Pradesh Andhra Pradesh 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Madhusudan Ghosh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Economics & PoliticsVisva- BharatiSantiniketan, BirbhumIndia

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