Advertisement

Harmonious Phenological Data: A Basic Need for Understanding the Impact of Climate Change on Mango

  • Shailendra Rajan
  • H. Ravishankar
  • Divya Tiwari
  • V. K. Singh
  • Pooja Saxena
  • Shilpi Singh
  • Y. T. N. Reddy
  • Kaushal Kishore Upreti
  • M. M. Burondkar
  • A. Bhagwan
  • R. Kennedy
Chapter

Abstract

Uniformly collated phenological data set is the most important requirement for developing climate change impact models for mango. Consistently collected phenological records directly indicate the effect of change in climatic parameters by depicting shifts in phenological events. Recording of consistent data pertaining to phenophases as a function of time serves as critical input for working out integrated interaction of interannual variability, spatial differences and climate variability impacts. In general, uniform qualitative data recording is difficult in mango due to variations in plant growth and development under diverse climatic fluxes occurring in subtropical to tropical regions. Major observed effects of climate change on mango include early or delayed flowering, multiple reproductive flushes, variations in fruit maturity, abnormal fruit set and transformation of reproductive buds into vegetative ones. These critical phenophase-dependent events require supporting quantitative data representing behaviour of sufficient number of shoots within a tree for objective analysis of factors influencing them. For monitoring the phenophase dynamics, use of extended BBCH (Biologische Bundesanstalt, Bundessortenamt und Chemische Industrie) scale developed for mango helps in monitoring the phenology by employing uniform methodology over same or different locations with the description of each phenophase in mango as distinctly classified by adopting numerical code. A manual to elucidate the methodology for general users has been developed with the help of pictorial representation of phenophases along with corresponding scores, analysis, depiction of results and interpretation for uniform data recording, and this can be downloaded from http://offseasonmango.cishlko.org/phenology.pdf.

Keywords

Phenological Stage Phenological Data Phenological Event Phenological Observation Mango Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Aubert B, Lossois P (1972) Considerations sur la phenologie des especes fruitieres arbustives. Fruits 27(4):269–286Google Scholar
  2. Fleckinger J (1948) The vegetative stages of fruit trees in relation to treatment. French Pomology 81–93Google Scholar
  3. Hernandez Delgado PM, Aranguren M, Reig C, Fernandez Galvan D, Mesejo C, Martinez Fuentes A, Galan Sauco V, Agusti M (2011) Phenological growth stages of mango (Mangifera indica L.) according to the BBCH scale. Sci Hortic 130:536–540CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. IPCC (2001) Climate Change 2001: the scientific basis. In: Houghton JT, Ding Y, Griggs DJ, Noguer M, van der Linden PJ, Dai X, Maskell K, Johnson CA (eds) Contribution of working group I to the third assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New York, p 881. (www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/)
  5. Rajan Shailendra, Divya Tiwari, Singh VK, Reddy YTN, Upreti KK, Burondkar MM, Bhagwan A, Kennedy R Richard, Pooja Saxena (2011) Application of extended BBCH Scale for phenological studies in mango (Mangifera indica L.). J App Hortic 13(2):108–114Google Scholar
  6. Rajan Shailendra, Ravishankar H, Divya Tiwari, Singh VK, Pooja Saxena, Reddy YTN, Upreti KK, Burondkar MM, Bhagwan A, Kennedy R (2012) Manual for phenological observations on mango. http://offseasonmango.cishlko.org/phenology.pdf

Copyright information

© Springer India 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shailendra Rajan
    • 1
  • H. Ravishankar
    • 2
  • Divya Tiwari
    • 4
  • V. K. Singh
    • 3
  • Pooja Saxena
    • 2
  • Shilpi Singh
    • 5
  • Y. T. N. Reddy
    • 6
  • Kaushal Kishore Upreti
    • 7
  • M. M. Burondkar
    • 8
  • A. Bhagwan
    • 9
  • R. Kennedy
    • 10
  1. 1.Crop Improvemnt and BiotechnologyCentral Institute for Subtropical HorticultureLucknowIndia
  2. 2.Central Institute for Subtropical HorticultureLucknowIndia
  3. 3.Crop Poduction, Central Institute for Subtropical HorticultureBihar Agricultural UniversitySabourIndia
  4. 4.Bihar Agricultural UniversitySabourIndia
  5. 5.National Botanical Research InstituteLucknowIndia
  6. 6.Division of fruit cropsIndian Institute of Horticultural ResearchBangaloreIndia
  7. 7.Division of Plant Physiology and BiochemistryIndian Institute of Horticultural ResearchBangaloreIndia
  8. 8.Dr. Balasaheb Sawant Konkan Krishi VidyapeethDapoliIndia
  9. 9.Fruit Research StationSangareddy-MedakIndia
  10. 10.Floriculture Research StationThovalai, KanyakumariIndia

Personalised recommendations