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Adaptation and Mitigation Strategies for Climate-Resilient Horticulture

  • Harish Chandra Prasad Singh
Chapter

Abstract

The growth of horticulture, as seen in India, has been in 5 phases, which started with a share of 5% GDP of agriculture to 30.4% now. Due to climate change, it is projected that rainfall over India will increase by 15–40%, and the mean annual temperature will increase by 3–6°C by the end of twenty-first century. Shift in varietal choice may become necessary in case of grapevines, banana, mango and other important horticultural crops. Moisture stress has been addressed through the development of varieties tolerant to drought and rainfed conditions. Studies indicate that delaying the date of planting can be an adaptation strategy in most of the states of the Indo-Gangetic plains to minimize the yield reductions while for West Bengal and Kharif potato-growing regions. Dogridge (Vitis champine) has been found promising for improvement in vigour, yield and quality of seedless grapes as well as tolerance to drought and salinity. The number of disease epidemics has dramatically increased in recent years and also the threat of emerging new diseases and the re-emergence of other diseases. Some recent examples are incidence of thrips-transmitted tospoviruses and whitefly-transmitted begomoviruses in chilli, cucurbits, okra and tomato. Hence, there is a need to thoroughly understand the potential climate change impacts on host–pathogen interactions, in order to evaluate appropriate disease management strategies. Horticulture-based farming systems have high potential for sequestering carbon for mitigation of climate change. The perennial trees act as carbon sinks by sequestering the atmospheric carbon. Availability and development of good simulation models for horticultural fruit and vegetable crops is lacking in India probably with exception of potato and coconut where InfoCrop model has been adopted and validated for different agro-ecological regions. For adaptation strategies the emphasis should be on development of production systems for improved water-use efficiency and to adapt to the hot and dry conditions. Strategies like changing, sowing or planting dates, modifying fertilizer application, providing irrigation during critical stages of the crop growth and conservation of soil moisture reserves by mulching with crop residues and plastic mulches are the most important interventions. Development of climate-resilient horticultural crops which are tolerant to high temperature, moisture stress, salinity and climate proofing through genomics and biotechnology would be essentially required.

Keywords

Late Blight Adaptation Strategy Horticultural Crop Plastic Mulch Tobacco Streak Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Confederation of Horticultural Association of India (CHAI)DwarkaIndia

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