Advertisement

Radiation Detection in Herbals

  • Devi Datt Joshi
Chapter

Abstract

Herbal and products in solid form are exposed to γ-irradiation to reduce the postharvest losses, ensure hygienic quality, and facilitate trade. Analytical methods such as PPSL, TL, and EPR/ESR spectroscopy have been investigated to identify the potential of γ-ray irradiation treatment, and the differences between nonirradiated and irradiated products, to ensure its safety for consumption. This chapter reviews recent activities concerning use of herbals and irradiated herbals, focusing on the irradiation for seasonings from the safety aspect. TL has been proved to be the most reliable and successful method to distinguish all kinds of irradiated samples from the nonirradiated/control samples.

Keywords

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectrum Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Signal Glow Curve Black Pepper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Pal S, Kim BK, Kim WY, Kim MJ, Ki HA, Lee KH, Kang WS, Kang IH, Kang SJ, Song JM. Identification of γ-ray irradiated medicinal herbs using pulsed photostimulated luminescence, thermoluminescence, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Anal Bioanal Chem. 2009;394:1931–45.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Diehl J. Safety of irradiated foods. 2nd ed. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc; 1995, 310, 454.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Farkas J. Irradiation for better foods. Trends Food Sci Technol. 2006;17:148–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Thayer DW. Food irradiation: benefits and concerns. J Food Qual. 1990;13:147–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Razskazovskiy Y, Debije MG, Howerton SB, Williams LD, Bernhard WA. Strand breaks in X-irradiated crystalline DNA: alternating CG oligomers. Radiat Resist Res. 2003;160:334–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Mukherjee PK. Quality control herbal drugs-an approach to evaluation of botanicals. New Delhi: Business Horizons; 2002, 110048.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sadecka J. Irradiation of spices – a review. Czech J Food Sci. 2007;25:231–42.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Miller RB. Electronic irradiation of foods. New York: Springer; 2005. p. 8–11.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Sadecka J, Kolek E, Peťka J, Suhaj M. Influence of two sterilization ways on the volatiles of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). Chem List. 2005;99:335–8.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sadecka J, Kolek E, Peťka J, Kovač M. Impact of gamma-irradiation on microbial decontamination and organoleptic quality of oregano (Origanum vulgare L.). In: Proceedings of Euro Food Chem XIII, Hamburg; 2005. p. 590–4.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Topuz A, Ozdemir F. Influences of gamma irradiation and storage on the capsaicinoids of sun-dried and dehydrated paprika. Food Chem. 2004;86:509–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Lianzhong D, Songmei Z, Qiying G, Yan Z. Study on irradiation sterilization of spices. Institute of Applied Technical Physics of Zhejiang Province, China. 1998. On http://epaper.kek.jp/a98/apac98/6d059.pdf. As on 8 Jan 2012.
  13. 13.
    Calucci L, Pinzono C, Zandomeneghi M, Capocchi A. Effects of γ-irradiation on the free radical and antioxidant contents in nine aromatic herbs and spices. J Agric Food Chem. 2003;51:927–34.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Polovka M, Brezova V, Staško A, Mazur M, Suhaj M, Šimko P. EPR investigations of gamma-irradiated ground black pepper. Radiat Phys Chem. 2006;75:309–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Raffi J, Stocker P. Electron paramagnetic resonance detection of irradiated food stuffs. Appl Magn Reson. 1996;10:357–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Polonia I, Esteves MP, Andrade ME, Empis J. Identification of irradiated peppers by electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence and viscosity. Radiat Phys Chem. 1995;46:757–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Yordanov ND, Gancheva V. A new approach for extension of the identification period of irradiated cellulose-containing foodstuffs by EPR spectroscopy. Appl Radiat Isot. 2000;52:195–8.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Malec-Czechowska K, Dancewicz GSAM, Delincee WSH. Detection of irradiation treatment in dried mushrooms by photostimulated luminescence EPR spectroscopy and thermoluminescence measurements. Eur Food Res Technol. 2003;216:157–65.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Yarbasi Z, Karabulut B, Karabulut A. An EPR study of gamma irradiated medicinal plants cress seeds and mistletoe. Gazi Univ J Sci. 2011;24(2):203–7.Google Scholar

Bibliography

  1. Bayram G, Delincee H. Identification of irradiated Turkish foodstuffs combining various physical detection methods. Food Control. 2004;15:81–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. CAC (Codex Alimentarius Commission). Codex general standard for irradiated foods. CODEX STAN 106–1983. Rev. 1–2003; 2003.Google Scholar
  3. Calucci L, Pinzono C, Zandomeneghi M, Capocchi A. Effects of γ-irradiation on the free radical and antioxidant contents in nine aromatic herbs and spices. J Agric Food Chem. 2003;51:927–34.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Communication (2001/C 241/03) from the commission on foods and food ingredients authorised for treatment with ionizing radiation in the community. Off J Eur Commun C 241/6–11 (29.08.2001).Google Scholar
  5. EC. Directive 1999/3/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 February 1999 on the establishment of a Community list of food and food ingredients treated with ionising radiation. Off J Eur Commun L 66/24–25; 1999.Google Scholar
  6. EC. Directive 1999/3/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 February1999 on the establishment of a Community list of foods and food ingredients treated with ionising radiation. Off J Eur Commun L 66/24; 1999.Google Scholar
  7. European Standard EN 1787. Foodstuffs – detection of irradiated food containing cellulose-method by ESR spectroscopy. Brussels: European Committee for Standardization; 2000.Google Scholar
  8. European Standard EN 13708. Foodstuffs – detection of irradiated food containing crystalline sugar by ESR spectroscopy. Brussels: European Committee for Standardization; 2001.Google Scholar
  9. European Standard EN 1788. Foodstuffs-Thermolumin­escence detection of irradiated food from which silicate minerals can be isolated. Brussels: European Committee for Standardization; 2001.Google Scholar
  10. IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Report of the ICGFI/IOCU seminar on food irradiation and consumers. The Netherlands, Sept. 1993.Google Scholar
  11. Sanderson DCW, Carmichael L, Fisk S. An international collaborative blind trial of photostimulated luminescence detection of irradiated herbs, spices and seasonings. SURRC report to MAFF; 1997.Google Scholar
  12. WHO. High-dose irradiation: wholesomeness of food irradiated with doses above 10 kGy. Report of a joint FAO/IAEA/WHO study group. WHO technical report series 890. Geneva: World Health Organization; 1999.Google Scholar
  13. Yordanov ND, Gancheva V. A new approach for extension of the identification period of irradiated cellulose-containing foodstuffs by EPR spectroscopy. Appl Radiat Isot. 2000;52:195–8.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Yordanov ND, Aleksieva K. X- and Q-band EPR studies on fine powders of irradiated plants. New approach for detection of their radiation history by using Q-band EPR spectrometry. Radiat Phys Chem. 2004;­69:59–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer India 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Amity Institute of Phytochemistry & PhytomedicineAmity University, Uttar PradeshNoidaIndia

Personalised recommendations