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Herbal Drugs: A Review on Practices

  • Devi Datt Joshi
Chapter

Abstract

Herbal is always associated with different human civilizations as pain reliever, accepted reliable drugs, and regulated as per social working approach to ensure consistent composition, safety, and potency. Herbals represent a wide range of chemical compounds, and quality herbal drug indicates confirmation of its identity and authenticity for efficacy and purity. Presently, a comprehensive account of chemical constituents and biological activities is available in libraries with critical appraisal of the ethnopharmacological descriptions. In view of the recent findings about the importance of herbal drugs, the object of present description is to link our great traditional knowledge and approach to modern medical and drug trends.

Keywords

Traditional Chinese Medicine Supercritical Fluid Extraction Herbal Drug Grape Seed Extract Chromatographic Fingerprint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Amity Institute of Phytochemistry & PhytomedicineAmity University, Uttar PradeshNoidaIndia

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