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A Soft Technology for Effective Enactive Management

  • Osvaldo García de la Cerda
  • Alejandro Salazar Salazar
Conference paper

Abstract

This chapter shows a soft technology for the care of the organizational performance by means of observation and configuration of critical enactive factors, which allow moving the actors’ action toward effectiveness in the management of any organizational domain.

The use of this technology generates changes in the networks of organizational conversations enhancing the capacity to handle complexity by means of an enactive view of management, where the embodiment of situations becomes the main process of success in applications.

Study cases allow highlighting the pragmatism of the technology and the benefits of offering a complementary view in the managing of organizational performance, generating structural adjustment, and rethinking the organizational practices.

Keywords

Enactive Approach Silence Area Soft Technology Human Activity System Ontological Tool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge with thanks the support of the Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial and DICYT-USACH through project 061217GDC “Gestión Enactiva: Uso de herramientas para la efectividad organizacional” and all the companies that used the proposed technology for this particular research. Special thanks to our colleagues Renato Orellana Muermann and María Soledad Saavedra for their contribution in the discussion and edition of this work.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Osvaldo García de la Cerda
    • 1
  • Alejandro Salazar Salazar
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Ingeniería IndustrialUniversidad de Santiago de ChileSantiagoChile

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