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Variety Mixtures/Cultivar Mixtures/Multilines

  • P. Parvatha Reddy
Chapter

Abstract

Cultivar mixtures are defined as ‘mixtures of cultivars that vary for many characters including disease resistance, but have sufficient similarity to be grown together’. Cultivar mixtures do not cause major changes to the agricultural system, generally increase yield stability, and in some cases can reduce pesticide use.

Cultivars used in the mixture must possess good agronomic characteristics and may be phenotypically similar for important traits including maturity, height, quality and grain type, depending on the agronomic practices and intended use. Cultivar mixtures in barley for the control of powdery mildew are an example of phenotypically similar mixtures, whereas red- and white-grained sorghum mixtures used in Africa are an example of phenotypically different mixtures.

The principles driving use of variety mixtures for disease control are soundly based in ecology. Epidemics are the exception in natural and semi-natural ecosystems, reflecting the balance derived from the co-evolution of hosts and pathogens. However, in modern agriculture in particular, this balance is far from equilibrium, and epidemics would be frequent were it not for highly effective pesticides and a plant breeding industry which introduces new cultivars to the market with new or different resistance genes. Such a situation is generally profitable when commodity prices are high, but it is costly and rates very poorly on sustainability and ecological or environmental parameter scales. This chapter describes theoretical, experimental and practical results obtained using mixtures of crop cultivars for disease suppression.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Leaf Rust Stripe Rust Susceptible Plant Pure Stand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Parvatha Reddy
    • 1
  1. 1.Indian Institute of Horticultural ResearchBangaloreIndia

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