Advertisement

Youth in India: Identity and Social Change

  • Parul Bansal
Chapter

Abstract

In the cycle of generations, youth is recognised as a bearer of fresh energy, and the individual so confirmed tests the vulnerability, strength, integrity and possibilities of the adult society to assess what the society would make of, ask of and allow himself or herself. The mutual sizing up is also accompanied by mutual plea (by both youth and adult representatives) for being recognised as individuals whose potentials are needed by the order that is or will be. Within the setting of psychosocial evolution, youth’s endeavours in the existing system have the power to confirm what is worthwhile and reform the rotten in the image of a new reality. No longer is it the task of only the old to teach the young the meaning of life. The young, too, by their actions and responses tell the old whether life as represented by the old and presented to them has meaning. In the human youth, fidelity is expressed in the alternation of affirmation and repudiation of social institutions and cultural traditions which reflect aspects of parental attitudes and interests.

Keywords

Indian Society Indian Family Father Figure Intergenerational Relationship Masculine Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Anandlakshmi (1978). Socialization for competence . Delhi: Indian Council for Social Science Research.Google Scholar
  2. Blos, P. (1962). On adolescence. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bose, G. (1956). The genesis and adjustment of the Oedipal wish. In T. G. Vaidyanathan & J. J. Kripal (Eds.), Vishnu on Freud’s desk: A reader in psychoanalysis and Hinduism (pp. 21–38). Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
  4. Chodorow, N. (1974). Family structure and feminine personality. In M. Z. Rosaldo & L. Lamphere (Eds.), Woman, culture and society (pp. 43–66). Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Chodorow, N. (1978). The reproduction of mothering: Psychoanalysis and the sociology of gender. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  6. Courtright, P. B. (1985). Fathers and sons. In T. G. Vaidyanathan & J. J. Kripal (Eds.), Vishnu on Freud’s desk: A reader in psychoanalysis and Hinduism (pp. 137–146). Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
  7. Erikson, E. H. (1958). Young man Luther. New York: W.W. Norton.Google Scholar
  8. Erikson, E.H. (1977). Toys and Reason. Stages in the Ritualization of Experience. W. W. Norton & Co., Inc., New York.Google Scholar
  9. Erikson, E. H. (1968). Identity: Youth and crisis. New York: W.W. Norton.Google Scholar
  10. Kakar, S. (1981). The inner world: A psychoanalytic study of childhood and society in India. Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Kakar, S. (1996). Modernity and female childhood. In Culture and psyche: Selected essays (pp. 24–28). Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Kakar, S., & Kakar, K. (2007). The Indians: Portrait of a people. Delhi: Penguin-Viking.Google Scholar
  13. Kanter, R. (1993). Becoming a situated daughter. In J. Mens-Verhulst, K. Scheurs, & L. Woertman (Eds.), Daughtering and mothering (pp. 26–35). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  14. Kapadia, S., & Miller, J. (2005). Parent-adolescent relationships in the context of interpersonal disagreements: View from a collectivist culture. Psychology in Developing Societies, 17(1), 33–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kashyap, L. D. (1993). Adolescent/youth family dynamics and development programmes. Indian Journal of Social Work, 54, 94–107.Google Scholar
  16. Keniston, K. (1968). Why students become radicals? Journal of American College Health Association, 17(2), 107–118.Google Scholar
  17. Nagpal, A. (2000). Cultural Continuity and Change in Kakar’s Works: Some Reflections. International Journal of Group Tension, 29(3/4), 285–322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Obeyesekere, G. (1990). Further steps in relativization: The Indian Oedipus revisited. In T. G. Vaidyanathan & J. J. Kripal (Eds.), Vishnu on Freud’s desk: A reader in psychoanalysis and Hinduism (pp. 147–162). Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
  19. Ramanujam, B. K. (1979). Towards maturity: Problems of identity seen in the Indian clinical setting. In S. Kakar (Ed.), Identity and adulthood (pp. 37–55). Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Ramanujam, A. K. (1983). The Indian Oedipus. In T. G. Vaidyanathan & J. J. Kripal (Eds.), Vishnu on Freud’s desk: A reader in psychoanalysis and Hinduism (pp. 109–136). Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
  21. Roland, A. (1988). In search of self in India and Japan: Towards a cross-cultural psychology. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Saraswathi, T. S., & Ganapathy, H. (2002). The Hindu worldview of child and human development: Reflections in contemporary parental ethnotheories. In H. Keller, Y. Poortinga, & A. Scholmerich (Eds.), Between biology and culture: Perspectives on ontogenetic development (pp. 80–88). London: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Saraswathi, T. S., & Pai, S. (1997). Socialization in Indian context. In H. Rao & D. Sinha (Eds.), Asian perspectives in psychology (pp. 74–92). Delhi: Sage.Google Scholar
  24. Shweder, R. (1991). Thinking through cultures: Expeditions in cultural psychology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Varma, P. K. (1998). The great Indian middle class. Delhi: Penguin-Viking.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer India 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.PsychologyLady Shri Ram College for WomenNew DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations