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Gender Inequality in the Labour Market

  • Arup Mitra
Chapter

Abstract

Women can be engaged directly in the development process, and they can experience the benefits of growth more equitably by generating increasingly productive employment opportunities for women (Behrman and Zhang 1995). However, there is no country in the world in which women’s quality of life is equal to that of men – quality of life being measured in terms of longevity, health status, educational opportunities, employment and political rights (UNDP 1993). Further, in developing countries, the situation is not only uneven but also distressing (Nussbaum and Glover 1995). In several countries, the work participation rates of women are substantially lower than that of men. Even when women are employed, they face pervasive wage discrimination not to talk about the long hours of unpaid household labour. Besides, there are several other issues relating to intra-household inequality in terms of consumption, assets and even participation in the decision-making process relating to the determination of the family size, education of children and the overall welfare of the household. Though the household head is expected to be an altruistic agent, often the male household head is neglectful of females, whether wives or children, and make decisions inimical to those interests (Nussbaum and Glover 1995).

Keywords

Labour Market Informal Sector Gender Inequality Female Employment Wage Inequality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arup Mitra
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Economic GrowthDelhi UniversityDelhiIndia

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