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The Snail

  • Mahesh Chandra Agrawal
Chapter

Abstract

Like any other Digenea, the schistosomes require a snail host where they develop from miracidium to cercaria and also multiply asexually, producing large number of cercariae to complete its life in the snail. Only freshwater snails are involved with mammalian schistosomes though some avian schistosomes develop in marine snails as well. The water bodies are important edge where definitive host excretes schistosome eggs, liberating miracidia, which in turn infect water snails; again, definitive host is prone to schistosome infection through cercariae, released by miracidia-infected snails. Thus, water is the medium where free-living schistosome stages, miracidia and cercariae, infect their respective hosts.

Keywords

Intermediate Host Snail Species Snail Host Schistosome Infection Snail Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer India 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahesh Chandra Agrawal
    • 1
  1. 1.Veterinary CollegeJabalpurIndia

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