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Technologies Developed

  • Mahesh Chandra Agrawal
Chapter

Abstract

For advancing knowledge in any scientific arena, it is imperative to have the required techniques with considerable accuracy and simplicity to be followed in any laboratory. This is more so in studying schistosomes and schistosomiasis being unique in character. While other fluke infections are developed experimentally in animals by feeding them with counted number of metacercariae, this is not the case with schistosomes. Though schistosome cercariae do develop per os, the results are erratic hence not reliable in quantitative studies. The metacercariae can be stored for long time in the laboratory for infection trials which is not the case with schistosome cercariae which are infective only within 24 h of their emergence. Further, most of the flukes are recovered from their hosts, during postmortem, following routine techniques, recovery of schistosomes need special techniques. Therefore, it is important to understand the principles of these techniques to be followed and also for their further improvement for higher sensitivity and simplicity. Journey of development of the techniques is the testimony of how simple techniques have been replaced with more complicated but more efficient techniques. Most of these techniques are related to experimental development of schistosome infections in the laboratory and may be performed with only a few equipments. The other issue is the problem in identifying species of the schistosomes or their snails correctly. In our opinion, it is always desirable to consult experts in the respective fields for confirming species or strains of the snails or schistosomes.

Keywords

Freshwater Snail Aquatic Weed Mulberry Leave Schistosome Infection Schistosome Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer India 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahesh Chandra Agrawal
    • 1
  1. 1.Veterinary CollegeJabalpurIndia

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