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The Development and Diffusion Processes of Sustainable Technologies and Implications for Public Policy: A Case Study in Japan

  • Kohta Juraku
  • Tatsujiro Suzuki
Conference paper

Abstract

There are numerous energy technologies that can contribute to a sustainable society. The market mechanism is an important process for developing and diffusing those technologies, but public policy can and should play important roles to facilitate such processes. In Japan, the national government has taken various initiatives in research and development (R&D) and in the introduction of renewable power technologies since the late 1970s. For example, solar power (PV) technology is often cited as a representative “successful” case initiated and strongly supported by the government.1 This solar power case can be seen as a “success” due to the government-led R&D and diffusion of the sustainable technology. Another “successful” example is wind technology. The installed capacity of wind power technology quickly rose more than 100 MW – as much as the installed capacity of PV. Development funding had been curtailed from national project research in the mid-1980s; and as a result, almost all wind turbines are imported from foreign countries.2 Still, such rapid developments were facilitated by various government measures, such as the Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) introduced in 2003. These are typical examples of government-led support for introduction and diffusion of sustainable energy technologies.

Keywords

Heat Pump Water Heater Renewable Portfolio Standard Natural Refrigerant Electric Water Heater 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EngineeringThe University of TokyoBunkyo-kuJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Public PolicyThe University of TokyoBunkyo-kuJapan

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