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Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell-Related Molecules and Cells

  • Yasushi Takagi

Abstract

The characteristic findings of intimal thickening and resulting steno-occlusion at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) along with pathological changes in neighboring arteries have been enumerated in the guidelines for the diagnosis of moyamoya disease [1, 2]. Fibrocellular thickening of the intima, an irregular disruption of the internal elastic lamina, and the attenuation of the media are the main findings [1, 3]. These findings have been observed not only in the carotid fork but also in cortical branches of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) [1, 3, 4]. In perforating arteries, microaneurysm formation and fragmented elastic lamina have been detected, and these are considered to be one of the reasons for intracerebral hemorrhage [1]. Sometimes, extracranial arteries such as superior temporal arteries (STA) and renal arteries have also been shown to be affected by the same stenotic changes, so that moyamoya disease can be considered to be a kind of systemic diseases [5].

Keywords

Internal Carotid Artery Middle Cerebral Artery Hepatocyte Growth Factor Intimal Hyperplasia Moyamoya Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryKyoto University Graduate School of MedicineKyotoJapan

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