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Proteins, Cells, and Immunity in the Moyamoya Disease: An Overview

  • Seung-Ki Kim
  • Kyu-Chang Wang
  • Byung-Kyu Cho

Abstract

The pathogenesis of moyamoya disease (MMD) has not been fully clarified. A multifactorial mode of inheritance may be involved in disease occurrence or susceptibility.

The rare incidence and low mortality rate of the disease, the limited availability of surgical specimens from affected internal carotid arteries, and the lack of animal models of MMD represent obstacles to the basic research of MMD. Because of these limitations, the analysis of peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients has been an effective means of investigating the pathogenesis of this disease.

This chapter describes the role of proteins, cells, and immunity in the pathogenesis of MMD.

Keywords

Hepatocyte Growth Factor Moyamoya Disease Superficial Temporal Artery Intimal Thickening Endothelial Adhesion Molecule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Pediatric Clinical Neuroscience Center, Seoul National University Children's HospitalResearch Center for Rare Disease Seoul National University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Pediatric Clinical Neuroscience Center, Seoul National University Children's HospitalSeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea

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