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Other Methods of Donor Harvesting

  • Damkerng Pathomvanich

Abstract

We are all aware that hair follicles are not always arranged parallel or in rows. There are variations in hair direction and angles over the scalp. This deviation is most obvious at the cowlick, where hairs exit as a swirl. Fortunately, a cowlick is not often found at a donor site. Also, the shaft exiting from the scalp does not necessarily follow the same angle as the infundibulum. In many people the donor hair, instead of pointing inferiorly, may be directed sideways either to the left or to the right. Consequently, any harvesting technique carries a risk for transecting these follicles. The different hair directions in the donor site must be examined properly before harvesting.

Keywords

Donor Site Hair Shaft Impulsive Force Male Pattern Baldness Hair Transplant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Damkerng Pathomvanich
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.DHT ClinicBangkokThailand
  2. 2.Bumrungrad HospitalBangkok

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