Advertisement

On Detection and Isolation of Defective Cells in Self-Timed Cellular Automata

  • Teijiro Isokawa
  • Ferdinand Peper
  • Shin’ya Kowada
  • Naotake Kamiura
  • Nobuyuki Matsui
Conference paper
Part of the Proceedings in Information and Communications Technology book series (PICT, volume 1)

Abstract

Defect-tolerance, the ability to overcome unreliability of components in a system, will be essential to realize computers built by nanotechnology. This paper reviews two approaches to defect-tolerance for nanocomputers that are based on self-timed cellular automata, a type of asynchronous cellular automaton, where the cells’ defects are assumed to be of the stuck-at fault type. One approach for detecting and isolating defective components (cells) is in a so-called off-line manner, i.e., through isolating defective cells and laying out circuits in the cellular space. In the other approach, defective cells can be detected and isolated while computation takes place, i.e., in an on-line manner. We show how to cope with defects in the cellular space in a self-contained way, while a computation task is conducted on it.

Keywords

Cellular Automaton Cellular Automaton Output Port Input Port Transition Rule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Durbeck, L.J.K., Macias, N.J.: The cell matrix: an architecture for nanocomputing. Nanotechnology 12, 217–230 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Peper, F., Lee, J., Adachi, S., Mashiko, S.: Laying out circuits on asynchronous cellular arrays: a step towards feasible nanocomputers? Nanotechnology 14, 469–485 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Peper, F., Lee, J., Abo, F., Isokawa, T., Adachi, S., Matsui, N., Mashiko, S.: Fault-Tolerance in Nanocomputers: A Cellular Array Approach. IEEE Trans. on Nanotechnology 3(1), 187–201 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Isokawa, T., Kowada, S., Takada, Y., Peper, F., Kamiura, N., Matsui, N.: Defect-Tolerance in Cellular Nanocomputers. New Generation Computing (2007)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Isokawa, T., Kowada, S., Peper, F., Kamiura, N., Matsui, N.: Online marking of defective cells by random flies. In: El Yacoubi, S., Chopard, B., Bandini, S. (eds.) ACRI 2006. LNCS, vol. 4173, pp. 347–356. Springer, Heidelberg (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Lee, J., Peper, F., Adachi, S., Morita, K., Mashiko, S.: Reversible computation in asynchronous cellular automata. In: 3rd Int. Conf. on Unconventional Models of Computation 2002, pp. 220–229. Springer, Heidelberg (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Priese, L.: Automata and Concurrency. Theoretical Computer Science 25, 221–265 (1983)MATHCrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Morita, K.: A simple universal logic element and cellular automata for reversible computing. In: Margenstern, M., Rogozhin, Y. (eds.) MCU 2001, vol. 2055, pp. 102–113. Springer, Heidelberg (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Takada, Y., Isokawa, T., Peper, F., Matsui, N.: Universal construction and self-reproduction on self-timed cellular automata. Int. J. of Modern Physics C 17(7), 985–1007 (2006)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Tokyo 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teijiro Isokawa
    • 1
  • Ferdinand Peper
    • 2
  • Shin’ya Kowada
    • 1
  • Naotake Kamiura
    • 1
  • Nobuyuki Matsui
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Computer Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringUniversity of HyogoHyogoJapan
  2. 2.Nano ICT GroupNational Institute of Information and Communications TechnologyKobeJapan

Personalised recommendations