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Conservation and Management of the Coastal Pine Forest as a Cultural Landscape

  • Michiro Fujihara
  • Mariko Ohnishi
  • Hiroyuki Miura
  • Yoshihiro Sawada
Part of the Ecological Research Monographs book series (ECOLOGICAL)

Abstract

Coastal forests, which are located between the sea and human settlement, are one of the representative cultural landscapes in East Asia, because they are multifunctional and are closely related to the daily life of the residents of the area. However, the functions of coastal pine forests have been changing since the 1960s. In this chapter, we aim to describe the historical changes in the relationship between coastal forests and nearby residents, and propose methods of conservation and management for the coastal forests as a cultural landscape. Coastal forests are mainly populated by Japanese black pine trees. Forest maintenance should change according to region. Beginning in the 1970s, many large pine trees died of pine wilt disease, and bare ground appeared after the removal of these dead trees. Planting events were frequent, but selective cutting for density control was not conducted. Coastal sand vegetation is an important remnant of natural vegetation, but beaches are places of recreation that utilize the natural environment. It is important for artificial land use and the maintenance of natural vegetation to coexist.

Keywords

Sand Dune Local Resident Landscape Structure Bare Ground Cultural Landscape 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michiro Fujihara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mariko Ohnishi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hiroyuki Miura
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yoshihiro Sawada
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Awaji Landscape Planning and Horticulture AcademyAwajiJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Landscape Design and ManagementUniversity of HyogoAwajiJapan
  3. 3.Department of City PlanningItamiJapan
  4. 4.Okinawa Environment ClubNahaJapan

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