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A Thought on the Continuity Hypothesis and the Origin of Societal Evolution

  • Kazuhisa Taniguchi
Part of the Springer Series on Agent Based Social Systems book series (ABSS, volume 6)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the continuity hypothesis in Witt [10] and to consider the origin of societal evolution. The continuity hypothesis which is addressed in Witt [10] is an assumption that evolution of life and society are continuing and evolutionary change continues beyond the range of what can be explained by Darwin’s theory of evolution. In addition to this point, Witt [10] has claimed that the assumption gives the ontological basis of evolutionary economics.1 According to the continuity hypothesis, societal evolution and organic evolution must be differently separated from each other, because, since these evolutions are separated, it can be insisted that there is continuity between them. So where is the continuing point of organic evolution and societal evolution? Where can be found the range which can not be explained by Darwin’s theory of evolution? This is the first question of this paper and the author holds that the rhetoric in the continuity hypothesis is artful and it attracts readers, though some parts of the rhetoric seem odd.

Keywords

Cultural Evolution Small Band Continuity Hypothesis Great Leap Societal Evolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhisa Taniguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EconomicsKinki UniversityHigashiosaka, OsakaJapan

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