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Disorders of the Central Nervous System and VEMPs: Detecting Lesions in the Vestibulospinal Pathway

Abstract

As vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing has been regarded as a clinical test of the saccule and its afferents, it has been mainly applied to diseases of the peripheral vestibular system. However, because the neural pathway of VEMPs includes the vestibulospinal tract in the brainstem, it could also detect disorders in the vestibulospinal tract, especially the medial vestibulospinal tract. The application of VEMP testing to diseases that mainly affect the central nervous system (CNS) are discussed in this chapter.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Auditory Brainstem Response Vestibular Evoke Myogenic Potential Myogenic Potential Prolonged Latency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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