Advertisement

The Endocrine-Disrupting Effect of Organotin Compounds for Aquatic Organisms

  • Toshihiro Horiguchi

The first report of masculinized female gastropod mollusks was made by Blaber (1970), describing a penis-like outgrowth behind the right tentacle in spent females of the dog-whelk, Nucella lapillus around Plymouth, UK. The term, “imposex”, however, was defined by Smith (1971), meaning imposed sexual organs, to describe the syndrome of a superimposition of male genital tracts, such as penis and vas deferens, on female gastropods. Imposex is thought to be an irreversible syndrome (Bryan et al. 1986). Reproductive failure may be brought about in severely affected stages of imposex, resulting in population decline and/or mass extinction (Gibbs and Bryan 1986, 1996). Imposex is known to be induced in many species by trib-utyltin (TBT), and also by triphenyltin (TPT) released from antifouling paints on ships and fishing nets (Bryan et al. 1987, 1988; Gibbs et al. 1987; Horiguchi et al. 1995, 1997a).

Keywords

Digestive Gland International Maritime Organization Reproductive Failure Organotin Compound Antifouling Paint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bauer B, Fioroni P, Ide I et al. (1995) TBT effects on the female genital system of Littorina littorea, a possible indicator of tributyltin pollution. Hydrobiologia 309:15–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bech M (2002a) A survey of imposex in muricids from 1996 to 2000 and identification of optimal indicators of tributyltin contamination along the east coast of Phuket Island, Thailand. Mar Pollut Bull 44:887–896.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bech M (2002b) Imposex and tributyltin contamination as consequence of the establishment of a marina and increasing yachting activities at Phuket Island, Thailand. Environ Pollut 117: 421–429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Blaber SJM (1970) The occurrence of a penis-like outgrowth behind the right tentacle in spent females of Nucella lapillus (L.). Proc Malacol Soc Lond 39:231–233.Google Scholar
  5. Bryan GW, Gibbs PE, Hummerstone LG et al. (1986) The decline of the gastropod Nucella lapil- lus around south-west England: evidence for the effect of tributyltin from antifouling paints. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 66:611–640.Google Scholar
  6. Bryan GW, Gibbs PE, Burt GR et al. (1987) The effects of tributyltin (TBT) accumulation on adult dog-whelks, Nucella lapillus: long-term field and laboratory experiments. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 67:525–544.Google Scholar
  7. Bryan GW, Gibbs PE, Burt GR (1988) A comparison of the effectiveness of tri-n-butyltin chloride and five other organotin compounds in promoting the development of imposex in the dog-whelk, Nucella lapillus. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 68:733–744.Google Scholar
  8. Coelho MR, Fuentes S, Bebianno MJ (2001) TBT effects on the larvae of Ruditapes decussates. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 81:259–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Fioroni P, Oehlmann J, Stroben E (1991) The pseudohermaphroditism of prosobranchs; morphological aspects. Zool Anz 226:1–26.Google Scholar
  10. Fretter V (1984) Prosobranchs. In: Wilbur KM (ed) The Mollusca Vol. 7. Reproduction (Tompa AS, Verdonk NH, van den Biggelaar JAM, eds). Academic, Orlando, FL: pp.1–45.Google Scholar
  11. Gibbs PE, Bryan GW (1986) Reproductive failure in populations of the dog-whelk, Nucella lapil-lus, caused by imposex induced by tributyltin from antifouling paints. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 66:767–777.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Gibbs PE, Bryan GW (1996) TBT-induced imposex in neogastropod snails: masculinization to mass extinction. In: de Mora SJ (ed) Tributyltin: Case Study of an Environmental Contaminant. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: pp.212–236.Google Scholar
  13. Gibbs PE, Bryan GW, Pascoe PL et al. (1987) The use of the dog-whelk, Nucella lapillus, as an indicator of tributyltin (TBT) contamination. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 67:507–523.Google Scholar
  14. Gibbs PE, Pascoe PL, Burt GR (1988) Sex change in the female dog-whelk, Nucella lapillus, induced by tributyltin from antifouling paints. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 68:715–731.Google Scholar
  15. Gibbs PE, Bryan GW, Pascoe PL et al. (1990) Reproductive abnormalities in female Ocenebra erinacea (Gastropoda) resulting from tributyltin-induced imposex. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 70: 639–656.Google Scholar
  16. Gibbs PE, Spencer BE, Pascoe PL (1991) The American oyster drill, Urosalpinx cinerea (Gastropoda): evidence of decline in an imposex affected population (R. Blackwater, Essex). J Mar Biol Assoc UK 71:827–838.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Goldberg ED (1986) TBT: an environmental dilemma. Environment 28:17–20, 42–44.Google Scholar
  18. Hamada M, Inoue M (1993) Seed production of the ivory shell, Babylonia japonica Reeve [in Japanese]. Bull Tottori Prefect Fish Exp Station 193–195.Google Scholar
  19. Hamada M, Inoue M (1994) Seed production of the ivory shell, Babylonia japonica Reeve [in Japanese]. Bull Tottori Prefect Fish Exp Station 182–184.Google Scholar
  20. Hamada M, Inoue M (1995) Seed production of the ivory shell, Babylonia japonica Reeve [in Japanese]. Bull Tottori Prefect Fish Exp Station 204–206.Google Scholar
  21. Hamada F, Kanazawa T, Yamamoto E (1988) Seed production of the ivory shell, Babylonia japonica Reeve [in Japanese]. Bull Tottori Prefect Fish Exp Station 6:110–116.Google Scholar
  22. Hamada F, Kanazawa T, Yamamoto E (1989) Seed production of the ivory shell, Babylonia japonica Reeve [in Japanese]. Bull Tottori Prefect Fish Exp Station 7:103–109.Google Scholar
  23. Horiguchi T (2000) Molluscs. In: Kawai S, Koyama J (eds) Problems of Endocrine Disruptors in Fisheries Environment. [in Japanese] Koseisha-Koseikaku, Tokyo: pp.54–72.Google Scholar
  24. Horiguchi T (2004) Gastropods. In: Takeuchi I, Tanabe S, Hino A (eds) Biological Monitoring for Anthropogenic Chemicals in Low Doze [in Japanese]. Koseisha-Koseikaku, Tokyo: pp.37–67.Google Scholar
  25. Horiguchi T, Shimizu M (1992) Effects on aquatic organisms, mainly on molluscs. In: Satomi Y, Shimizu M (eds) Organotin Pollution and Its Effects on Aquatic Organisms. [in Japanese] Koseisha-Koseikaku, Tokyo: pp.99–135.Google Scholar
  26. Horiguchi T, Shiraishi H, Shimizu M et al. (1994) Imposex and organotin compounds in Thais clavigera and T. bonni in Japan. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 74:651–669.Google Scholar
  27. Horiguchi T, Shiraishi H, Shimizu M et al. (1995) Imposex in Japanese gastropods (Neogastropoda and Mesogastropoda): effects of tributyltin and triphenyltin from antifouling paints. Mar Pollut Bull 31:402–405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Horiguchi T, Shiraishi H, Shimizu M et al. (1997a) Effects of triphenyltin chloride and five other organotin compounds on the development of imposex in the rock shell, Thais clavigera. Environ Pollut 95:85–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Horiguchi T, Shiraishi H, Shimizu M et al. (1997b) Imposex in sea snails, caused by organotin (trib-utyltin and triphenyltin) pollution in Japan: a survey. Appl Organomet Chem 11:451–455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Horiguchi T, Takiguchi N, Cho HS, Kojima M, Kaya M, Shiraishi H, Morita M, Hirose H, Shimizu M (2000) Ovo-testis and disturbed reproductive cycle in the giant abalone, Haliotis madaka: possible linkage with organotin contamination in a site of population decline. Mar Environ Res 50:223–229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Horiguchi T, Kojima M, Kaya M et al. (2002) Tributyltin and triphenyltin induce spermatogenesis in ovary of female abalone, Haliotis gigantea. Mar Environ Res 54:679–684.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Horiguchi T, Shiraishi H, Morita M (2003) Specific tissue distributions of organotin compounds in prosobranch gastropods. [Abstract] SETAC 24th Annual Meeting Abstract Book p.290.Google Scholar
  33. Horiguchi T, Kojima M, Takiguchi N et al. (2005) Continuing observation of disturbed reproductive cycle and ovarian spermatogenesis in the giant abalone, Haliotis madaka, from an organotin-contaminated site of Japan. Mar Pollut Bull 51:817–822.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Horiguchi T, Kojima M, Hamada F et al. (2006) Impact of tributyltin and triphenyltin on ivory shell (Babylonia japonica) populations. Environ. Health Perspectives 114:Supplement 1:13–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Imai T, Takiguchi N, Horiguchi T (2006) Estimation of the causal factor for declining abalone populations in Jogashima, Kanagawa, Japan. Bull Kanagawa Prefect Fish Technol Center 1:51–58, 2006 [in Japanese].Google Scholar
  36. Inoue S, Oshima Y, Nagai K et al. (2004) Effect of maternal exposure to tributyltin on reproduction of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata martensii). Environ Toxicol Chem 23:1276–1281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. International Maritime Organization (IMO) (2001) Adoption of the final act of the conference and any instruments, recommendations and resolutions resulting from the work of the conference. International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships, 2001 (AFS/CONF/26, 18 October 2001). London, UK: International Maritime Organization, 1–26.Google Scholar
  38. Kajikawa A (1984) Sexual characteristics, spawning abilities and their percentage occurrence in populations of Babylonia japonica Reeve [in Japanese]. Bull Tottori Prefect Fish Exp Station 2:31–32.Google Scholar
  39. Kajikawa A, Yamamoto E, Masutani R (1983) Sexual characteristics and spawning abilities in the ivory shell, Babylonia japonica Reeve [in Japanese]. Bull Tottori Prefect Fish Exp Station 1:16–18.Google Scholar
  40. Lapota D, Rosenberger DE, Platter-Rieger MF et al. (1993) Growth and survival of Mytilus edulis larvae exposed to low levels of dibutyltin and tributyltin. Mar Biol 115:413–419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Li Q, Osada M, Takahashi K et al. (1997). Accumulation and depuration of tributyltin oxide and its effect on the fertilization and embryonic development in the Pacific oyster, Crassostreagigas. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 58:489–496.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Marshall DJ, Rajkumar A (2003) Imposex in the indigenous Nassarius kraussianus (Mollusca: Neogastropoda) from South African harbours. Mar Pollut Bull 46:1150–1155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Mensink B, Boon JP, ten Hallers-Tjabbes CC et al. (1997) Bioaccumulation of organotin compounds and imposex occurrence in a marine food chain (Eastern Scheldt, The Netherlands). Environ Technol 18:1235–1245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Nakayama K, Oshima Y, Nagafuchi K et al. (2005) Early-life-stage toxiCity in offspring from exposed parent medaka, Oryzias latipes, to mixtures of tributyltin and polychlorinated biphe-nyls. Environ Toxicol Chem 24:591–596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Oehlmann J, Fioroni P, Stroben E et al. (1996) Tributyltin (TBT) effects on Ocinebrina aciculata (Gastropoda: Muricidae): imposex development, sterilization, sex change and population decline. Sci Total Environ 188:205–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Ruiz JM, Bryan GW, Gibbs PE (1995) Acute and chronic toxiCity of tributyltin (TBT) to pedi-veliger larvae of the bivalve Scrobularia plana. Mar Biol 124:119–126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Schulte-Oehlmann U, Oehlmann J, Fioroni P et al. (1997) Imposex and reproductive failure in Hydrobia ulvae (Gastropoda: Prosobranchia). Mar Biol 128:257–266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Shim WJ, Kahng SH, Hong SH et al. (2000) Imposex in the rock shell, Thais clavigera, as evidence of organotin contamination in the marine environment of Korea. Mar Environ Res 49:435–451.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Smith BS (1971) Sexuality in the American mud snail, Nassarius obsoletus Say. Proc Malacol Soc Lond 39:377–378.Google Scholar
  50. Sole M, Morcillo Y, Porte C (1998) Imposex in the commercial snail Bolinus brandaris in the northwestern Mediterranean. Environ Pollut 99:241–246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Takamaru T, Fuji A (1981) Reproductive cycles in populations of Neptunea arthritica from the southern coastal waters of Hokkaido, Japan [in Japanese]. Suisan Zoshoku 29:78–87.Google Scholar
  52. ten Hallers-Tjabbes CC, Wegener JW, Van Hattum BA et al. (2003) Imposex and organotin concentrations in Buccinum undatum and Neptunea antiqua from the North Sea: relationship to shipping density and hydrographical conditions. Mar Environ Res 55:203–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Terlizzi A, Delos AL, Garaventa F et al. (2004) Limited effectiveness of marine protected areas: imposex in Hexaplex trunculus (Gastropoda: Muricidae) populations from Italian marine reserves. Mar Pollut Bull 48:188–192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Tomita K (1967) Annual Report of Hokkaido Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station (7):1–7 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  55. Tomita K (1968) Annual Report of Hokkaido Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station (9): 56–61 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  56. Uki N (1989) Sexual maturation, development and growth in gastropods, and their control [in Japanese]. In: Takashima F, Hanyu I (eds) Reproductive Biology of Fish and Shellfish. Midori Shobo, Tokyo: pp.367–417.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshihiro Horiguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Center for Environmental RiskNational Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan

Personalised recommendations