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New Directions in Urban Regeneration and the Governance of City Regions

  • Tetsuo Kidokoro
  • Akito Murayama
  • Kensuke Katayama
  • Norihisa Shima
Part of the cSUR-UT Series: Library for Sustainable Urban Regeneration book series (LSUR, volume 7)

Abstract

Cities should be recognized as social, economic as well as environmental systems formed through networks of cities, towns and villages rather than as isolated entities. Conceptualized as such, they are often called city regions. Central cities of city regions, which we call regional cities, play a decisive role in regional as well as national development. In an age of globalization, competition among such city regions is one of the major driving forces in their on-going transformation. Globalization may strengthen the sustainability of some city regions through enlarging their economic bases, or may weaken their sustainability through the loss of industrial competitiveness or loss of geopolitical importance. Indeed, regional cities are now at a crossroads of whether they decline or are regenerated under the impacts of globalization.

Keywords

Urban Regeneration Spatial Planning Regional Governance City Region Smart Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tetsuo Kidokoro
    • 1
  • Akito Murayama
    • 2
  • Kensuke Katayama
    • 3
  • Norihisa Shima
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Urban EngineeringThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Engineering and Architecture Graduate School of Environmental StudiesNagoya UniversityJapan
  3. 3.Department of Urban EngineeringThe University of TokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Civil EngineeringThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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