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Vegetation-geographic evaluation of the syntaxonomic system of valley-bottom forests occurring in the cooltemperate zone of the Japanese Archipelago

  • Keiichi Ohno

Abstract

Most of the Japanese Archipelago (Fig. 1), except Hokkaido, is located in an oceanic climate strongly influenced by seasonal rain fronts and typhoons (Yoshino 1978; Murata 1995). The soil is thus greatly eroded by rain wash in various places in Japan, especially in the headwaters and upper reaches of river and in steep river valleys where fluvial terraces are formed. On the other hand, because of high sedimentation during freshets and floods, alluvial fans and deltas are formed in middle and lower reaches of rivers.
Fig. 1

Japanese Archipelago and its parts. (1 Kii Peninsula, 2 Izu Pen., 3 Shimokita Pen., 4 Oshima Pen.)

Keywords

Riparian Forest Fluvial Terrace Differential Species German Summary Montane Belt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keiichi Ohno
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Environment and Information SciencesYokohama National UniversityYokohamaJapan

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