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Occurrence of hillslope processes affecting riparian vegetation in upstream watersheds of Japan

  • Toshikazu Tamura

Abstract

Any riparian forest stands on landforms which are formed, maintained and altered by fluvial processes. Activity of fluvial processes is therefore the matter of principal concern in the study of riparian vegetation. Fluvial processes in the broad sense (Leopold et al. 1964) include both stream action, that is fluvial processes in the narrow sense, and mass-movements, that is customarily classified as hillslope processes (Carson & Kirkby 1972). Although relatively frequent events of flood provide fluvial sediments, mass-movements which occur less frequently bring about alteration of landforms and substrata of not only valley sides but also valley bottoms in upstream watersheds.

Keywords

Debris Flow Riparian Vegetation Riparian Forest Shallow Landslide Debris Avalanche 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshikazu Tamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environment Systems, Faculty of Geo-environmental ScienceRissho UniversityKumagaya, SaitamaJapan

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