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Parameters for detection of Alicyclobacillus and test methods

  • Keiichi Goto

Abstract

Since 1982 when incidents of deterioration due to Alicyclobacillus (later identified as A. acidoterrestris) occurred in Germany1), more than 40 different test methods to detect Alicyclobacillus have been developed worldwide. This can partly be attributed to the thermophilic and acidophilic characteristics of Alicyclobacillus which make in vitro cultivation of the bacteria so difficult. Sensitivity and precision varies among the methods. Differences between the test results obtained in the country of production and those obtained after the importation of the product, has generated commercial conflicts. This situation is also influenced by differences among countries in perceptions regarding thermo-acidophilic bacteria and the commercial damage caused by them. In 2001, the IFU (International Federation of Fruit Juice Producers, Paris, France), began international cooperative efforts towards standardization of the methods for detecting thermo-acidophilic bacteria (Alicyclobacillus). These efforts resulted in publication of the “First Standard IFU-Method on the Detection Alicyclobacillus in Fruit Juices” in April 2003. Later, a revision of the IFU method, entitled “Method on the Detection of taint producing Alicyclobacillus in Fruit Juices, revision 1” was published in September 2004 (IFU Handbook Microbiological Methods, Method No.12).

Keywords

Fruit Juice Orange Juice Heat Shock Treatment Heat Shock Condition Membrane Filter Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keiichi Goto
    • 1
  1. 1.Food Research LaboratoriesMitsui Norin Co.,Ltd.Japan

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