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Patterns of Excitatory Amino Acid Release and Ionic Flux After Severe Human Head Trauma

  • R. Bullock
  • A. Zauner
  • O. Tsuji
  • J. J. Woodward
  • A. T. Marmarou
  • H. F. Young

Abstract

In many of the conditions that result in acute cerebral damage, the role of excitatory amino acids has become the focus of current investigation [1, 2]. The demonstration of excitatory amino acid release has been shown in several animal models of brain trauma, and has been associated with both structural damage and metabolic abnormalities [3–5]. These changes may be reversed by administration of excitatory amino acid antagonists, and this group of compounds has shown a greater magnitude of neuroprotective effect than any other series of drugs in the laboratory [3, 6]. As part of an ongoing study, we have recently measured release of excitatory amino acids (EAAs) and ions in 17 acutely head-injured patients in our institution, with the aim of determining the circumstances that are responsible for glutamate release and their possible role as an exacerbating factor in causing secondary brain damage after severe human head injury.

Keywords

Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Excitatory Amino Acid Secondary Insult Acute Subdural Hematoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Bullock
    • 1
  • A. Zauner
    • 1
  • O. Tsuji
    • 1
  • J. J. Woodward
    • 1
  • A. T. Marmarou
    • 1
  • H. F. Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of NeurosurgeryMedical College of VirginiaRichmondUSA

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