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Abstract

Many scholars hold that Japan’s machine industries became the world’s strongest competitors, because they are built on small- and medium-sized (hereinafter small and medium) suppliers and semifinished-goods subcontractors with high technological capability, especially in production control know-how. The casting, forging, metal stamping, and powder metallurgy industries are important suppliers to a range of machine industries.1 The quality of their parts strongly affects the quality of final products. Most casting firms classified as subcontractors are small- to medium-sized in terms of capital and employees.

Keywords

Cast Iron Small Firm Business Association Parent Firm Industrial Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sakura Kojima
    • 1
  1. 1.Bunka Women’s UniversityTokyoJapan

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