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Natural Variation in Translational Activities of the 5′ Nontranslated RNAs of Genotypes 1a and 1b Hepatitis C Virus: Evidence for a Long Range RNA-RNA Interaction Outside of the Internal Ribosomal Entry Segment

  • Masao Honda
  • Geoff Abell
  • Shuichi Kaneko
  • Kenichi Kobayashi
  • Stanley M. Lemon

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded, enveloped RNA virus which is classified within the hepacivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae [1]. There is extensive genetic heterogeneity among different HCV strains, with at least six major genotypes and a series of related subtypes recognized thus far [2,3]. Among these, genotype 1 is predominant worldwide and comprised of two major subtypes, genotypes la and lb [2]. Although some clinical studies have found no differences in the clinical expression of liver disease that are related to the genotype of the infecting virus [4], others have suggested that genotype lb infections may be more resistant to interferon therapy [5,6], and may confer greater risk for development of hepatocellular carcinoma than infection with nongenotype lb strains including genotype la viruses [7].

Keywords

Translational Activity Hepatitis Delta Virus Internal Ribosomal Entry Sequence Internal Ribosomal Entry Segment Dicistronic Transcript 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masao Honda
    • 1
  • Geoff Abell
    • 2
  • Shuichi Kaneko
    • 1
  • Kenichi Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Stanley M. Lemon
    • 2
  1. 1.First Department of Internal MedicineKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Departments of Microbiology and ImmunologyThe University of Texas Medical Branch at GalvestonGalvestonUSA

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