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Value of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Acute Stroke Therapeutic Trials

  • J. C. Grotta
  • S. K. Hanson
  • W. Pasteur
  • H. Rhoades
  • H. D. Tran
  • L. M. Lamki
  • B. J. Barron
  • W.J Taylor
Conference paper

Abstract

The current approach in clinical trials for acute stroke is early intervention, whether it be with thrombolytic or cytoprotective therapy. There are several reasons why it is important to attain a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of ischemic injury in these early hours. First, the degree, location, and duration of ischemia and reperfusion phenomena may influence response to therapy as well as predict potential catastrophic consequences, so that cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements may help select or stratify patients for therapeutic intervention. Second, such studies may give us insight into the frequency and degree of successful reperfusion. Third, because of inaccuracies in even the most widely accepted clinical grading scales, it would be useful to have an objective measurement that would reinforce the clinical exam for determining patient selection and response to therapy.

Keywords

Single Photon Emission Compute Tomography Acute Ischemic Stroke Cerebral Edema Barthel Index Brain Single Photon Emission Compute Tomography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Grotta
    • 1
  • S. K. Hanson
    • 1
  • W. Pasteur
    • 1
  • H. Rhoades
    • 2
  • H. D. Tran
    • 3
  • L. M. Lamki
    • 3
  • B. J. Barron
    • 3
  • W.J Taylor
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Texas Health Science CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Texas Health Science CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyUniversity of Texas Health Science CenterHoustonUSA

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