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Abstract

In this book, two types of primary acquired cholesteatoma are discussed: one is attic cholesteatoma, which develops when Shrapnell’s membrane (the pars flaccida) retracts into Prussak’s space and then into the epitympanic cavity, and the other is adhesive cholesteatoma, which develops from retraction pockets into the epitympanic cavity when the tympanic membrane adheres to the promontory. Bezold (1889) stated that attic cholesteatoma is the result of occlusion of the eustachian tube that causes retraction pockets of Shrapnell’s membrane in which the keratinizing layer of epithelium desquamates. His retraction pocket theory has received widespread acceptance (Tos et al. 1988).

Keywords

Eustachian Tube Tympanic Cavity Retraction Pocket Posterior Tympanotomy Mastoid Surgery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tamotsu Morimitsu
    • 1
  1. 1.Miyazaki Medical CollegeMiyazakiJapan

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