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Ginkgo Landscapes

  • Mariko Handa
  • Yasuo Iizuka
  • Nobuo Fujiwara

Abstract

Since ancient times, Ginkgo has stimulated people’s imaginative powers and permitted culture of many kinds to bloom. Among many distinctive features, the shape of its leaves especially has stimulated the creative powers of artists and served as the theme of poetry. Johann Wolfgang Goethe (1749-1832) sang as follows in the poem titled “Gingo Biloba” in the West-Eastern Divan: “Is it one living thing that has become divided within itself? Are these two who have chosen each other, so that we know them as one?” (translated by David Luke) [1]. Ginkgo personifies a world of harmony with oneself and is also called the tree of love. It is a mysterious tree that reminds us of how the Occident and the orient have met and influenced each other. This chapter considers the Ginkgo in Japan, a nation of the orient.

Keywords

Main Building Trunk Diameter Camphor Tree Formal Style Roadside Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariko Handa
    • 1
  • Yasuo Iizuka
    • 2
  • Nobuo Fujiwara
    • 3
  1. 1.Environment DepartmentMinistry of ConstructionTsukuba, Ibaraki 305Japan
  2. 2.Planning Division, Planning and Research Administration DepartmentPublic Works Research Institute, Ministry of ConstructionTsukuba, Ibaraki 305Japan
  3. 3.Michinoku Lakewood National Government Park Works OfficeTohoku Regional Construction Bureau, Ministry of ConstructionKawasaki Cho, Shibata Gun, MiyagiJapan

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