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Fungal Association with Ginkgo biloba

  • Takayuki Aoki

Abstract

In the Gymnospermae, coniferous substrata have been well examined for associating fungal species, e.g., in phytopathological studies, in floral investigation including edible or toxic mushrooms, and in the research of fungal succession phenomena following decomposition of leaf litter or wood [1,2]. Fungi in relation to Ginkgo biloba have not been well studied, however. Because of its less common distribution in the wild and because of the limited industrial use of Ginkgo wood, interests of many mycologists until now have been mainly confined to fungi pathogenic to Ginkgo street trees.

Keywords

Leaf Litter Leaf Disc Plant Pathogenic Fungus Alternaria Alternata Ginkgo Biloba 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takayuki Aoki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Genetic Resources INational Institute of Agrobiological Resources, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesTsukuba, Ibaraki 305Japan

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