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Models of Endothelial Cell Junctions

  • R. Skalak
Conference paper

Abstract

This paper reviews some recent theoretical models of endothelial cell junctions and transport of fluid through the clefts. The classical system of small and large pores is replaced by a system of slits. It is postulated that the uniform spacing of 200 A is maintained by macromolecules which bridge between two cell membranes. Such bridging molecules could maintain the observed cell spacing without causing a major increase in flow resistance. The molecular forces at tight junctions account for the bending of cell membranes and discontinuities in the tight junctions leave tortuous pathways allowing passage of solutes up to the size of albumin.

Keywords

Pressure Drop Tight Junction Poiseuille Flow Uniform Spacing Fiber Matrix 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Skalak
    • 1
  1. 1.Bioengineering Institute, Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering MechanicsColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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