Advertisement

Distribution of Wall Shear Stress and Microfilament Bundles in Endothelial Cells in Canine Coronary Artery in vivo

  • A. Kitabatake
  • J. Tanouchi
  • M. Uematsu
  • K. Ishihara
  • K. Fujii
  • Y. Yoshida
  • H. Ito
  • M. Hori
  • N. Tominaga
  • H. Yoshimura
  • T. Kamada
Conference paper

Abstract

The relation between wall shear stress (SS) in vivo and the microfilament bundles (MF) in endothelial cells (EC) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was investigated in 5 mongrel dogs. Peak shear stress was determined from the flow velocity profile at its peak velocity using a multigate 20 MHz pulsed Doppler velocimeter. Peak SS at the outer side in LAD was significantly greater than that at the cardiac side. The amount of MF in EC was evaluated in the excised vessel segments with transmission electron microscopy as the ratio of the area filled with MF to the total area of EC (F/C). F/C at the outer side was significantly greater than that at the cardiac side. These results suggested that SS increases the amount of MF in EC in canine coronary artery in vivo.

Keywords

Wall Shear Stress Left Anterior Descend Outer Side High Shear Stress Transmission Electron Microscopic Examination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Sabbah HN, Khaja F, Hawkins ET, Brymer JF, McFarland TM, van der Bel-Kahn J, Doerger PT, Stein PD (1986) Relation of atherosclerosis to arterial wall shear in the left anterior descending coronary artery of man. Am Heart J 112: 453–458PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Franke RP, Graefe M, Schnittler H, Seiffge D, Mittermayer C (1984) Induction of human vascular endothelial stress fibers by fluid shear stress. Nature 307: 648–649PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Wechezak AR, Viggers RF, Sauvage LR (1985) Fibronectin and F-actin redistribution in cultured endothelial cells exposed to shear stress. Laboratory Investigation 53: 639–647PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Kajiya F, Ogasawara Y, Tsujioka K, Nakai M, Goto M, Wada Y, Tadaoka S, Matsuoka S, Mito K, Fujiwara T (1986) Evaluation of human coronary blood flow with an 80 channel 20 MHz pulsed Doppler velocimeter and zero-cross and Fourier transform methods during cardiac surgery. Circulation74(suppl III), 53–60Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    White GE, Gimbrone MA Jr, Fujiwara K (1983) Factors influencing the expression of stress fibers in vascular endothelial cells in vivo. J Cell Biol 97: 414–424Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Wong AJ, Herman IM, Pollard TD (1983) Actin filament stress fibers in vascular endothelial cells in vivo. Science 219: 867–869PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    Masuda H, Shozawa T, Hosoda S, Kanda M, Kamiya A (1985) Cytoplasmic microfilaments in endothelial cells of flow loaded canine carotid arteries. Heart and Vessels 1: 65–64PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    Shasby DM, Shasby SS, Sullivan JM, Peach MJ (1982) Role of endothelial cell cytoskeleton in control of endothelial permeability. Circ Res 51: 657–661PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Wysolmerski R, Lagunoff D (1985) The effect of ethchlorvynol on cultured endothelial cells: a model for the study of the mechanism of increased vascular permeability. Am J Pathol 119: 505–512PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Kitabatake
    • 1
  • J. Tanouchi
    • 1
  • M. Uematsu
    • 1
  • K. Ishihara
    • 1
  • K. Fujii
    • 1
  • Y. Yoshida
    • 1
  • H. Ito
    • 1
  • M. Hori
    • 1
  • N. Tominaga
    • 1
  • H. Yoshimura
    • 2
  • T. Kamada
    • 1
  1. 1.The First Department of MedicineOsaka University School of MedicineOsaka, 553Japan
  2. 2.Nippon Zoki Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.HyogoJapan

Personalised recommendations