Advertisement

Intraoperative Evaluation of Blood Velocity Waveforms in Different Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

Sequential Saphenous Vein Graft and Internal Mammary Artery Graft
  • F. Kajiya
  • S. Kanazawa
  • S. Matsuoka
  • Y. Ogasawara
  • K. Tsujioka
  • T. Fujiwara
Conference paper

Abstract

We investigated the characteristics of blood velocities in different types of coronary bypass grafts, i.e., the saphenous vein graft (SVG; 6 cases) vs the internal mammary artery graft (IMAG; 6 cases) and for different positioning of the sequential saphenous vein bypass graft (SSVG), i.e., the side-to-side anastomosis (SSA) vs the end-to-side anastomosis (ESA), the life span of which are known to be different. The blood velocities were measured by the dual mode (zerocross and FFT), multichannel, high frequency ultrasound Doppler method during bypass graft surgery. Comparing the blood velocities in the SVG with those in the IMAG (longer life span), the velocity profile was much more parabolic and the velocity spectrum was narrower in the IMAG. Regarding the velocities in the SSVG (the SSA has longer life span), the skew of the velocity profile and the reverse flow at the position just proximal to the SSA were always recognized near the probe-side wall (the opposite side of the SSA), indicating the existence of flow separation and recirculation in this region. The direction of skew changed between the SSA and the ESA in almost all cases. These patterns of blood flow seem to be a contributory factor in determining the fate of the graft.

Keywords

Velocity Profile Left Anterior Descend Blood Velocity Saphenous Vein Graft Velocity Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. (1).
    Fitz’Gibbon GM, Leach AJ, Keon WG, Burton JR, Kafka HP (1986) J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 91: 773–778Google Scholar
  2. (2).
    Ogasawara O, Hiramatsu O, Kagiyama M et al (1984) IEEE Computers in Cardiol: 447–450Google Scholar
  3. (3).
    Kajiya F, Ogasawara Y, Tsujioka K et al (1986) Circulation 74 (Suppl III): 53–60Google Scholar
  4. (4).
    Kajiya F, Tsujioka K, Ogasawara Y et al (1987) Circulation 76: 1092–1100PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. (5).
    Lytle BW, Loop FD, Cosgrove DM, Ratliff NB, Easley K, Taylor PC (1985) J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 89: 248–258PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. (6).
    Campeau L, Enjalbert M, Lesperance J, Vaislic C, Grondin CM, Bourassa MG (1983) Circulation 68 (Suppl II): 1–7Google Scholar
  7. (7).
    Kieser TM, Fitz’Gibbon GM, Keon WG (1986) J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 91: 767–772PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. (8).
    Freed DB, Hartley CJ, Noon GP, Short D (1984) Circulation 70 (part-II): II-384 (abstr)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Kajiya
    • 1
  • S. Kanazawa
    • 2
  • S. Matsuoka
    • 1
  • Y. Ogasawara
    • 1
  • K. Tsujioka
    • 1
  • T. Fujiwara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Engineering and Systems CardiologyKawasaki Medical SchoolKurashikiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Thoracic SurgeryKawasaki Medical SchoolKurashikiJapan

Personalised recommendations