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Absorption of Organic and Inorganic Air Pollutants by Plants

  • Kenji Omasa
  • Kazuo Tobe
  • Takayuki Kondo

Abstract

Plant leaves possess metabolic processes that can biochemically transform many of the absorbed air pollutants (Koziol and Whatley 1984; Schulte-Hostede et al. 1987; Yunus and Iqbal 1996; Sandermann et al. 1997; De Kok and Stulen 1998), thereby allowing the leaves to continuously absorb the gases without being saturated with them. Therefore, plants are thought to play key roles in determining the fate of atmospheric pollutants of both man-made and natural origins.

Keywords

Stomatal Conductance Methyl Ethyl Ketone Stomatal Opening Atmos Environ Foliar Absorption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer -Verlag Tokyo 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenji Omasa
    • 1
  • Kazuo Tobe
    • 2
  • Takayuki Kondo
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoBunkyo-ku, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory of Intellectual Fundamentals for Environmental StudiesNational Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukuba, IbarakiJapan
  3. 3.Air Quality SectionToyama Prefectural Environmental Science Research CenterKosugi, ToyamaJapan

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